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Miss USA Sarah Rose Summers Takes Pride in Voting
31 Oct 2018

Miss USA Sarah Rose Summers Takes Pride in Voting

Hollywood Life
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As deadlines to register to vote near and the Nov. 6th midterm elections sneak up, Miss USA Sarah Rose Summers urges everyone to let their voices be heard!

In the final round of the Miss USA competition in May 2018, host Vanessa Lachey asked the then-Miss Nebraska, Sarah Rose Summers, what she would write on a blank poster if she were going to a rally or march. “Use your voice, share your voice, because no matter what you’re going to a rally or march for, you care about that cause and have something to say,” Sarah Rose responded. Shortly after, she was crowned the first Miss USA from Nebraska, and has since inspired others to continue to speak their truths and use their voices. Partnering with DoSomething.org, Sarah Rose has been advocating for her fans and followers in the United States to get out and vote in the midterm elections on Nov. 6, saying it’s one of the best ways to use your voice.

“As Americans, we have the right to vote, so we have to act on that,” Sarah Rose told HollywoodLife.com in an EXCLUSIVE interview. “Specifically, as women, we have the right from the 19th amendment to vote, and there were so many women who fought for this right for us. So, not only do we need to vote to have our voices heard, and so that our government officials are chosen by us and for us, but also we have to honor those women that fought so hard and sometimes even risked their lives to have this right for us. It wouldn’t be honoring them and our history if we did not.”

Sarah Rose, who hails from the small town of Papillion outside of Omaha, NE, revealed that she has cast her vote for the midterms via absentee ballot, since she is currently residing in NYC! “It wasn’t difficult to do,” Sarah explained. “It’s been exciting to have this platform as Miss USA where I can reach my own generation and encourage them to do what they need to, to be able to vote, no matter where they are in the world. A lot of people our age (24) aren’t necessarily based where you may be registered, but it’s really not that difficult.”

She added that in this political climate, it’s not only important to use our voices, but to listen to each other. “It’s our job to get out there and use our voices and educate each other, but more importantly we have to listen to each other, because if we all go out, and we all start screaming and hollering and tweeting and telling each other why we care about things we care about, but we don’t listen to each other when we share those things, then we’re not going to get anywhere.”